Make your own free website on Tripod.com

MASHING

Home
DISCLAIMERS
Nanda's Page
Peggy's Corner
GILLE'S CORNER
MEMBERS PAGES
Charles 803
C803-CFR
COPPER / PLASTICS
BOILERS
HEAT SOURCES
PRESSURE RELIEF VALVE
HOSES & THINGS
V-47 VALVE
THERMOMETERS
FEEDSTOCKS
MASHING
FERMENTATION
YEASTS
ENZYMES
DISTILLATION
Still Location
DEHYDRATION
ZEOLITES
DENATURANTS
ETHANOLPRO FAQ'S
Robert Warren Wrote
'Questions from Mars'
Phase separation
E85
EERE News
GLOSSARY
Historia
Raoult's Law and Phase Diagrams
Castor Oil Process
Tables & Forms
CELLULOSE
Alphabetic Listing
COSTS
TECH-REF
Reverse Osmosis
TUBE DATA
FUELS DATA

MOTHER's Mash Recipes for Alcohol Production

  • Romantic notions of the mountain moonshiner stoking up his still deep in the woods soon fade away when one seriously attempts to produce his or her own "liquid sunshine".
  • For example, though distillation is the fun part of the process, preparing the mash, fermenting it, and using the by-products are the real work -- as well as the keys to running an efficient operation.
  • MOTHER's staffers have been hard at it for the last year -- (1979-1980)  mixing and mashing -- and we've put together a series of formulas to help take the mystery and confusion out of ethanol fuel production.
  • The list of raw materials that can be used to make alcohol grows each day.
    • Newcomers -- such as mangel-wurzels (or fodder beets), Jerusalem artichokes, manioc, poplar trees, cellulose waste, and even cattails -- have been added to the list of traditionals, which includes corn, sugar cane, potatoes, rice, and barley.
    • (There are also peculiar -- but potentially fruitful -- food industry byproducts such as waste pastry and stale tortilla chips.)
  • Despite the variety, every alcohol-producing raw material belongs to one of three groups:

<SOURCE> Mother Earth, 1980